Thursday, August 28, 2008

Chimerae in my larder

As some of you know, I make a lot of preserves and pickles and stuff from the things I grow in my garden and greenhouse. What you may not know is that I create labels for said produce before distributing jars among friends, family and neighbours. And it's become a standing joke now for me to describe the contents with a graphic rather than words. So ... can you guess what these products were?
Answers in the comments. Don't peek until you've had a guess!

15 comments:

Stevyn Colgan said...

Gooseberry Jam
Bramble Jelly
Crabapple Jelly
Marrow and Ginger Chutney
Grape Jelly

Me said...

my fav was the chutney - gorgeous with pate

Rob said...

Oh, that's such fun.

chris hale said...

Dear boy, I had no idea you had joined the WI.

You haven't got one of those Miss Marple type bikes with the little wicker basket on the front, have you?

Can I put in an order for a dozen jars of Granny's Colgan's marrow and quince jelly?

Janet said...

They sound wonderful...although I have to admit that I've never heard of Bramble Jelly before.

Janet

Stevyn Colgan said...

Me - Oh yes, it's fantastic with blue Stilton

Rob - I'm currently working on some new ones for this year's crop ...

Chris - Titter ye not Mr Hale! I haven't bought any jam or chutney for years. Why buy when you can make it pretty much for free? And it always tastes better than the shop stuff. Scarily, I do have both marrows and quinces in the garden so be careful what you wish for ... I may pop round on my bike.

Janet - The British love preserves and they come in three 'grades': Jellies are clear fruit preserves made with the juice only; jams are made with the fruit and the juice; and fruit 'cheeses' (not so popular these days) are very thick jams you can almost slice - great with pate, game meats etc. I made a damson cheese last year that was fantastic. Bramble jelly is simply a clear blackberry jelly. It's my favourite (especially as there are so many free blackberries around!).

chris hale said...

You would be more than welcome. I'll pop the kettle on and set another place at the tea table.

Debby said...

Confused about marrow. Here that refers to the gooey stuff inside bones. Since you're talking about having marrow in the garden, you're making me squeamish. Bone marrow in the garden here is a way to keep animals away from your garden.

Stevyn Colgan said...

Chris - Earl Grey, black, no sugar please

Debby - What we call a marrow is a very large courgette (or Zucchini over there I believe). Very tasty.

Debby said...

Oh, zucchini! Our Garrison Keillor does a very funny monologue about zucchini. He says that in the mythical town of Lake Woebegone, (where all the women are strong, all the men good looking, and all the children above average) the only time that the townfolk lock their car doors is in August, because that's when all the gardeners are looking for places to get rid of excess zucchini. If your car is unlocked, you come back to find it overflowing with zucchini. You go to shake someone's hand, and pull it back with a zucchini in it. You pick up your newspaper on the front step and discover it has been wrapped around a zucchini...

Stevyn Colgan said...

Debby - Oh yes, there's a lot of truth in that! Courgettes (I'll stick with the European vernacular) is so easy to grow. I planted eight plants this year and have had around 30-40 decent sized vegetables. So the surplus has been farmed out to anyone who'll have them. And I've let a few just grow and grow to create big, firm, tasty marrows. Great in chutney. But also fantastic hollowed out, stuffed (my favourite is savoury minced lamb with onions, garlic and Bulgar wheat) and baked. Yum.

Debby said...

I stuff mine with green peppers, onions, mushrooms, and tomatoes, ricotta cheese, and then when they are nearly done, I top with mozzarella, and put them back in until the cheese melts.

Stevyn Colgan said...

Niiiiiiiiccccccceeeeee.

Persephone said...

I guessed everything except the bramble jelly (which I thought was mint jelly) and the marrow and ginger chutney, because a) I don't care for chutney; b) I thought the ginger looked like cheezies [don't know what those are called in Britain, or if you even have them there -- they're pretty vile]; c)I couldn't remember the British for zucchini [as discussed above]; and therefore, d) a courgette/cheezie combo sounded appalling, even for British cuisine. ;^) Everything else sounds lovely, especially the bramble jelly -- I'm very partial to blackberries!

Stevyn Colgan said...

Hi Persephone - Yeah, we have Cheezies except here they're called Wotsits! Courgette/Cheezie? Yup, sounds ghastly. As for British cuisine ... I'm not entirely sure there is such a thing as the British are a bunch of mongrels. Consequently, our cuisine is pretty much stolen or borrowed from everyone else's. However, I honestly believe that we make the best sausages and meat pies on the planet.